Nov 19, 2010

Tip: Be Prepared for Travel Mishaps with LastPass!


There are few worse traveling experiences than losing your wallet, with the accompanying process of canceling cards and replacing personal IDs. So before you head out of town this holiday season, make sure that you're prepared for the worst by creating Secure Notes in LastPass.

Add Secure Notes for the credit cards, debit cards, driver's license, and other important documents, such as your medical card, that you'll be taking on your trip. Use the templates to document customer service phone numbers, security codes, account numbers, and other necessary information. If you lose a card, or your whole wallet, you'll not only have a record of the missing item(s), you can efficiently report and replace everything. You can securely log into your LastPass account on the hotel's computer, a friend's laptop, or your cell phone to safely and quickly access the data you need. LastPass will be there to help get you through and let you enjoy the rest of your trip.



Have a LastPass tip of your own? Share your thoughts, or send us your experiences at support@lastpass.com.

6 comments:

  1. Even if you are using a secure connection between your laptop and LastPass, you should always use a secure connection between your laptop and someone's free wi-fi access as well.

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  2. beware of firesheep

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  3. FireSheep will not affect LastPass, but if you log into other things through LastPass or similar, then it can affect that.

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  4. Encrypted connections (https) are not endangered by Firesheep or any other lurker on a public wifi network.
    However, I would recommend taking a few One-Time Passwords with you and keeping them in a hidden place outside the wallet. That way you'll never have to use your master password at an internet cafe, hotel, etc.

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  5. There are many ways to write down your password without fear of someone stealing it and knowing what to do with it.

    You could transpose the first or last two digits:
    J14NJ36V
    becomes
    J14NJ3V6

    or write it as a sentence, people are unlikely to even know it's a password:
    "on January 1 go to New Jersey with 36 roses for Victor"

    only numbers and capital letters count, thus: J1NJ36V

    ReplyDelete